FAQ's About the Committee

What happens to the profit made by the Halifax Charity Gala Committee?

Firstly please consider that the Halifax Charity Gala is an expensive event to stage. However it still allows local good causes to raise some £25,000 between them!

The Committee collect money to pay for the event in a number of ways. The committee however are not there to raise funds directly. The committee stage the event to allow good causes to rase funds for themselves.

Through ticket sales (50% of advanced tickets and 100% on the gate tickets), sponsorship and advertising the committee raises a significant sum which is used to fund the necessary road closures, toilet hire and other such requirements that the event needs to operate. We also have income from private companies on the gala ground and in the procession, which is used to distribute between our member causes. The Committee retains a reserve fund so that if for any reason we have a bad year we are still able to put on the Gala in years to come.That aside, once the bills have been paid, any profit is distributed between the Member Organisations. Keep an eye out in the News section to see just how much was distributed this year!

Not a single penny is paid to the Committee - all work is voluntary and all surplus is donated to our member causes.

Why Don't All the Charities get an Equal Share of the distribution?

Although the Committee stage the event, the Charities make it happen and make it the success that it is each and every year. The Committee are there to serve the Member Organisations.

The Committee have previously agreed to offer incentives to Member Organisations via the distribution of general funds made on the day. The distribution is increased for organisations that:

  • Take part in the procession
  • Sell tickets for the event
  • Attend the two Charities meeting we hold each year
  • Provide Litter Pickers on the Sunday

Once the above have been calculated, the remainder is distributed equally meaning that on the whole every active organisation gets a good portion of the distribution from the general fund.

Introduced in 2007 following Heath and Safety concerns, some charities had monies deducted from their distribition for breaking the rules regarding vehicle movements during the event. The number of vehicle movements has since reduced, but the option of fines still remains open to the committee.

What Happens to Money I give to a float?

This question is answered in 2 parts; firstly we need to know what type of float it is?

If it is a Float from a registered good cause...

Then as long as they have there own collection licence from Calderdale MBC (which almost all Member Organisations do!) they keep all the money given to them, just like they keep all the money taken on the stall and 50% of all money taken through advanced ticket sales (this is before distribution!).

If it is a company that is in the procession...

Then they are collecting for the Halifax Charity Gala Committee, and are supporting the event by either making a donation or providing a service in exchange for taking part in the procession. Some people see the money that goes to the Committee as lost but this is not the case, as it is distributed back to Member Organisations. See the FAQ - "What happens to the profit made by the Halifax Charity Gala Committee?"

Is the Halifax Charity Gala a registered Charity?

Although our sole objective is to benefit certain charities and good causes within Calderdale, we are not a charity ourselves. We are an Event Organiser and our remit is to stage an annual gala providing a forum for local charities to raise funds and their own profile. In doing this we also hope to provide a great day out for the people of Calderdale.

It is worth repeating that the HCG committee members are all unpaid volunteers. Furthermore, it is not the remit of the HCG to make a profit itself but aims to do so both as a bonus for the members and as a safeguard against loss. Every penny raised is either used to fund the next gala or split between each of the member charities.

 

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